Meandering Minnow

Nerdfighter. Video Gamer. Whovian. Crocheter. Future teacher.
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ineveryending:

Welcome to the climax of the show. Enjoy your stay.

I’m with Jane, though.  A detox cosmo sounds like the dumbest thing in the history of health food nonsense.  And there is a lot of health food nonsense out there.  On the plus side, it also looks kind of delicious, but a kale leaf does not a detox drink make (especially when you have vodka in it? Pretty sure half the purpose of a detox is to uh, get rid of toxins… like vodka). 

(via bennetdiaries)

elmify:

are you okay?

I have such a crush on Kira.

(via tessaviolet)

hatepotion:

'You could've taken anyone!’ said Ron in disbelief over dinner. ‘Anyone! And you chose Loony Lovegood?’

'Don't call her that, Ron,' snapped Ginny, pausing behind Harry on her way to join friends. 'I'm really glad you're taking her, Harry, she's so excited.'

(via marykatewiles)

tikken:

misanthropicshenanigans:

tentacuddles:

666zydratevials:

imthemiserychick:

everydreamstartswithdisney:

Megara meeting in Epcot, video by Disney LifeStyler [x]

Watch the video, she does the voice perfectly. Omg.

Amazing, Meg!

NO REALLY GUYS WATCH THE VIDEO LIKE DISNEY BROUGHT HER TO LIFE TO RUN AROUND OH MY GOSH

The sass is tangible

She’s even got -the walk-

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Were you a child prodigy?
heatherminnow heatherminnow Said:

fishingboatproceeds:

No.

I was a reasonably good elementary school student (although certainly not the best in my class), and then a not-very-good middle school student, and then a poor student for much of high school. (I failed my junior English class, and had to write essays about The Bluest Eye and Twelfth Night over the summer to get a D.)

Some of this had to do with intellectual challenges: I was a bit behind the curve when it came to abstractions. Like, I could not handle the idea of the equation x + 2 = 4, because x is not a number, so how is that even possible? My struggle with abstractions was also seen in my study of literature and anything that couldn’t be, like, memorized. (I’ve always been a pretty good speller, for instance.)

Some of my troubles in school also had to do with what in retrospect were social and mental health challenges. But I was very lucky to have teachers who saw a lot of potential in me and refused to give up on me, even when I was defiant and annoying and set off fireworks outside their bedroom windows. (Do not do this. It is not cool. It is just annoying.)

That said, I think it’s an oversimplification to say that I was a “troubled child” or whatever. By college, I was engaged and interested in many of my subjects and became, as my favorite college professor once called me, “a solid B+ kind of fellow.”

I don’t think it’s fair to see some kids as merely smart and others as merely troubled, or to think that kids who are performing poorly in school are simply miscreants/stupid/whatever. (It’s also unfair to portray kids who perform well in school or who have expansive vocabularies or whatever as inherently untroubled.)

Of course, none of this should be an excuse to give up. It can be really hard to try to stay engaged in school/learning/anything, especially when you don’t have the kind of support I was lucky to enjoy. But it’s also worth it. Learning is hard, and learning how to learn is hard, and it doesn’t happen overnight. It really is something that we have to do for a lifetime—or, more optimistically, that we get to do for a lifetime. 

Reblogging especially for that second to last paragraph.  I feel especially that the worth of children should not be solely determined by how well they do in school either.  I’ve dealt with too many people and too many teachers who don’t seem to see the student beyond the test score or the grade they received.  I’ve worked with kids who didn’t do as well in school, but were brilliant in some way or another.  I’ve worked with kids who got extremely good grades but were dealing with a lot of shit outside of school and still needed a certain kind of support and attention.  People are complicated and teaching or working with people isn’t just about their test score (although, at the end of the day, yeah it’s my job to figure out how to improve their reading score, but it’s a complicated process). 

This ask (and John’s answer) just gave me a lot of feelings, okay? 

maybeiwantthetrouble:

Woman? Is that meant to insult me?”

(via quillery)

melissaanelli:

shortmonica:

therealbarbielifts:

runfaster-getstronger-fitblr:

isaia:

samati:

skeletales:

This is unexpectedly not about make-up haha

reblogged before it was even finished.

SUPREME 

This is fantastic. I really needed it today.

Hahah omg she’s such a dork I love it(:

Wow, loved this!

Holy crap. Best video I’ve seen all week. Also reblogged before it was over.

1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

There’s the hufflepuff

(via foxesinthevineyard)

345,599 plays
Lorde,
Pure Heroine - EP

reserve:

holy shitballs

(via lastofthetimeladies)